Monday, July 27, 2009

Stetson University building


Stetson University in Deland, Florida is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention. Nevertheless, it has an excellent reputation, and is Deland's major claim to fame. The campus and buildings are quite attractive. This particular building caught our attention, but I can't remember it's function.

15 comments:

Cezar and Léia said...

I loved the words "Education is Power"! And what a huge columns!
This façade is outstanding indeed and your shot is perfect with the palm trees like a frame!
Well done Jacob!
Léia

Juergen Kuehn said...

"EDUCATION IS POWER"
That's absolutely right, Jacob, and so I love universities. Your great shot shows a grand and historical building to me.

Jane said...

Great photo. Actually, Stetson University severed ties with the Southern Baptist Convention in 1993. That is Sampson Hall, built in 1908, and is home to the Duncan Gallery of Art and various classrooms and offices.

Asta said...

Hi Jacob,

Beautiful building!
- And the inscription is true. Education is power - at least it is the key to power-:)

Best regards
Asta

Jacob said...

@ Jane - Thank you so very much for that information! I had thought that was true, but when I talked with a young lady in the office, she was quite definite that it was still part of the SBC!

I should have checked further.

Obviously, you're connected with the school, so I'm including here the link. Please watch for other photos in the future - we took "several," and it is truly a beautiful campus.

Here's the link to Stetson University:

http://www.stetson.edu/home/

m_m said...

I like it! Nice composition of colors! Great angle of the photo with the huge trees:)

cieldequimper said...

Oh wow, this is such a fabulous building. And religious or not, I agree 1000% with the inscription.

JM said...

This is a great composition!

Jacob said...

Hi Ceil - If you note a previous comment from Jane who's affiliated with Stetson, the university broke ties with the SBC in 1993...I was given the wrong info by an employee of the school...

And yes, the motto is right on!

cieldequimper said...

OK. PS: next time I'm over the big pond I'm gitten' mahself a Stetson!

Jacob said...

@ Ceil - Ah shore hopes ya do! Then,'course, y'all gotta walk a little bow-legged and chew gum way off to the side of yer face, and spit ev'ry once in a while!

Do ya got any boots? Boots go with a Stetson, ya knows.

cieldequimper said...

I'm not sure my temp crown would appreciate chewing gum. I haven't got the boots yet, they're on top of my "to buy" list! ;-)

Anonymous said...

Just FYI, Stetson is not at all related to Southern Baptists.

Gerri Bauer, gbauer@stetson.edu said...

Beautiful photo! The building is Sampson Hall. It was built as a library in 1908 with a grant from Andrew Carnegie. It was named after C.T. Sampson, a Massachusetts shoe manufacturer and university benefactor who donated money to the library every year until his death. The building functioned as a library until the 1960s when Stetson's duPont-Ball Library was built. Today, Sampson Hall houses art and language classrooms and the Duncan Gallery of Art.

And, as others noted: Stetson was affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention until the mid-1990s, when the relationship came to an end. The university is values-based, but isn't associated with any church or religion.

Thanks again for sharing such a beautiful photo!

Gerri in Stetson U's PR Office.

Gerri (gbauer@stetson.edu) said...

Part 2 from Gerri:

Stetson's formal affiliation was with the Florida Baptist Convention, not the Southern Baptist Convention.

The Southern Baptist Convention's presence was felt at the university in several ways through the decades, however: some funding; curriculum recommendations; keynote speakers at events; retirement plan; academic support for educators; and through mediation when conflicts arose between the university and state group.

A good reference for anyone wishing to learn more about the history is Dr. Gilbert L. Lycan's "Stetson University: The First 100 Years" (Stetson University Press, 1983).